Tag Archives: Life Lessons

How to Receive a Better Psychic Reading


Have you ever been curious about getting a psychic reading? When I had my first one 30 years ago (OMG!!!), I was absolutely fascinated. I couldn’t understand how they talked about  my inner thoughts so accurately.

After going to a few of them, I thought sure they were sharing notes on me. Each reading  was with different people, but had the same themes as the one before. How could they be seeing the same things just using intuition?? For myself I’ve always had a “sixth sense” about things:  from knowing who was about to call on the phone, to assessing the energy of people I was meeting for the first time.

I decided to go through the training at Psychic Horizons in SF and learn how to meditate and read energy. I learned how to have boundaries, and to respect a person’s space and never “read” them without their express permission. I practiced using my own intuition until it became strengthened and honed – and I realized that intuition is part of being human on this planet. Some people dismiss it and close off their own abilities, but I think most people have had their own strange coincidences and know it’s real.

Since then I’ve given thousands of people readings and healings through my own business. It’s stunning to think of where I started and where I’ve ended up. Supporting and guiding others has given me a full, happy life. I’ve met AMAZING people from every walk of life and every corner of the world. I’ve talked to mothers, wives and husbands; lawyers, soldiers, farmers, business women and men; artists, TV personalities, detectives and factory workers. I’ve encountered people from all income levels, faiths and passions – and from all over the world! It’s wonderful having “Facetime” and “Skype” nowadays because I can connect with anyone anywhere. The majority have positively impacted my own spiritual path.

There’s a handful of times though, I’ve encountered a readee who’s proves to be a challenge. Usually they are overwhelmed with emotion, blocked off, afraid of shifting, fearful of trusting me, in a lot of emotional pain or in denial. If I persist and sit with them, I can extract a gem of truth and healing that can assist the person, but it’s difficult and can take time.

I was happy to come across this post today by Matt Auryn, “How To Receive a Better Psychic Reading”. If you’ve ever thought about getting a reading, or haven’t found the right answers in readings, definitely read Matt’s perspective here!

For instance, be specific with your questions and be willing to accept you may not like what you hear. In fact, if you’re in too sensitive a space, you might want to wait to get a reading until you feel open to hearing an uncomfortable truth (in case one comes up). A good reader knows how to deliver difficult news in an inspiring way!

Here’s more of it:

“By being specific the reader can hone into that area of your life to give you more information, guidance, and specifics. Vague questions will often get vague responses. If you simply state “I want to look at my career.” A reader can look at what’s going on in your career and might be able to tell you what your career is. However, if you state, “I want to look at my career. Right now I’m a nurse and I’m not sure if where I’m working is the right place for me or if there’s a better option.” If you’re getting a reading that doesn’t interact directly with the reader, such as my private practice online where I read the person on my own and talk straight into a recorder, do not be afraid to provide information in the form. You will be glad you did.
Read more at http://www.patheos.com/blogs/matauryn/2017/11/05/receive-better-psychic-reading/#h1osVIHmr7Trrybq.99

If you’re interested in getting a reading with me, send me an email today!

#gettingapsychicreading #gettingahealing #crediblepsychics



Do this when you feel icky


“What Science Really Says About Negative Emotions.

Pretending unwelcome feelings don’t exist isn’t helping. Here’s what to do instead:

by Shelby Lorman.


Ever been told to smile when you’re feeling down? While there’s science to support the idea that forced positivity can temporarily boost your mood, convincing yourself that you’re always happy may do you more harm than good, according to an insightful piece on Quartz by Lila MacLellan. Research suggests suppressing your less-than-pleasant feelings can harm your psychological well-being, and that accepting them is a better option.
Acceptance isn’t about making peace with your negative emotions: the “magic of acceptance is in its blunting effect on emotional reactions to stressful events,” Brett Ford, a psychology professor at the University of Toronto, told MacLellan. Ford added that over time, acceptance of negative emotions can lead to “positive psychological health, including higher levels of life satisfaction.”
How and why this happens isn’t exactly clear. But Ford’s recently published research (in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology) offers some insights. The research is from a few years ago, when Ford was a doctoral student at the University of California, Berkeley. She and a few other Berkeley researchers designed a three-part experiment in hopes of learning more about the link between acceptance and psychological well-being. The participants were from various socioeconomic backgrounds and races, and included people who had dealt with major and minor negative experiences (think the difference between losing a job and losing track of your keys).
Ford and her fellow researchers found that people who were more accepting of negative emotions (MacLellan calls them “habitual acceptors”) like anger or anxiety had reduced feelings of ill-being, something backed up by previous research, and were more likely to have better well-being. MacLellan notes that “accepting dark emotions like anxiety or rage won’t bring you down or amplify the emotional experience. Nor will it make you ‘happy’—at least not directly.” Instead, acceptance is linked to overall “better mental health when it’s used in response to negative emotions, not positive ones,” MacLellan writes.
Ford hopes her research can improve future mental health treatments, which “currently rely on some approaches that fail people,” she told MacLellan. “When something happens and you try to reframe it like, ‘Oh it’s not such a big deal.’ or ‘I’m going to learn and grow from that,’ it doesn’t necessarily work,” Ford said.
Bad experiences are inevitable. But if we only let in the positive emotions, we’re less equipped to deal with the rollercoaster ride that is just part and parcel of being alive. “People die in our lives, we lose them, if we have only been accustomed to being allowed to have more positive thoughts, then these realities can strike us even more intensely when they happen—and they will happen,” according to Svend Brinkmann, a psychology professor at Denmark’s Aalborg University quoted in the piece.
Part of the challenge of acceptance is that it runs counter to our culture’s expectation to be happy all of the time. We’re living in a “cultural age that’s decidedly pro-positivity,” MacLellan writes, which makes the “pressure to suppress or camouflage negative feelings” all the more pronounced. In the West (especially in the U.S.) “happiness and positivity are seen as virtues,” MacLellan notes. Ford told her that “some companies want their customers and employees to be delighted all the time. That’s unreasonable, and when we’re faced with unreasonable expectations, it’s natural for us to start applying judgement to the negative mental experiences we have.”
This probably isn’t helped by the fact that social media today is awash in well-curated and filtered frames of positivity. While a quick mood boost might feel great, continually suppressing our own negative emotions in favor of feel-good things only sets us up for a “striving state of mind,” according to Ford, which is paradoxical to finding peace and acceptance.
The good news is that acceptance can be learned. You can start by thinking of “your emotions as passing clouds, visible but not a part of you,” MacLellan suggests. Next time you experience a negative emotion or feel pressured to smile when you’re really not feeling it, remember that, as Ford explains, “acceptance involves not trying to change how we are feeling, but staying in touch with your feelings and taking them for what they are.”
Read more on Quartz.