Tag Archives: Science

Biological Influence

 

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I stumbled across an episode of Forum with Stanford neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky the other day, and the show was so stunning I HAVE to share it. The influence of our biology on our decision-making is profound, and I find it fascinating.

Apparently, our brains are wired to become aggressive and angry when we’re fearful; to default into “us and them” mentality (which causes a host of social problems), and to make decisions based purely on smell and hunger. You gotta listen to it. We are homo sapiens. It’s so easy to forget while running our errands, getting to work on time, raising our kids. But WE ARE ANIMALS, and our biological impulses have a HUGE influence on our behavior.

Dr. Robert Sapolsky is a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, and has spent a lot of his life around primates and studying their behaviors. He finds interesting correlations with human behavior, and discusses them at length in his new book “Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst”.

Here’s the audio of the show. It really takes off eight minutes in… let me know what you think!

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Jupiter flyby

Unbelievable video of Jupiter released yesterday. I’m stunned. It is such a beautiful planet! Exquisite… just like the mysticism behind it.

Jupiter is going Direct on Friday, June 9th in the early morning.

“Every 53 days, NASA’s Juno spacecraft flies close to Jupiter and travels from the giant gas planet’s north pole to and past its south pole, shooting photos along the way. The eye-opening 2-minute video above was created using a set of these still photos.

Colossal reports that it takes 1.5 days for the 6 megabytes of photo data captured over 2 hours to be downloaded by scientists on Earth.

After the raw photos were beamed to Earth and made available to the public, Gerald Eichstädt colorized them, Sean Doran set the stills in motion, and Avi Solomon added some music to create the experience above — a taste of what flying over the gas planet would be like. The photos are color-enhanced, though, so what you’d see with your own eyes would be much more flat.

Here’s another colorized view created by NASA, Eichstädt, and Doran (and slightly brightened):

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You can find more of these colorized images and videos on Doran’s Flickr. You can also follow along with updates from the Juno mission on NASA’s website.”

Source: https://petapixel.com/2017/05/29/gorgeous-flyby-jupiter-made-photos-nasas-juno-spacecraft/

How childhood trauma could affect your life expectancy, relationships and mental health

This is an important article. If you feel you’ve suffered from childhood trauma, please get help and support. Please take it seriously. This is a common thread in many of the readings I do for people, and all of us deserve to find peace and happiness in our lives. Mindful Meditation is a fantastic method for dealing with these issues.
If this is you, please reach out and GET HELP.

 

Article by Sarah Young:

“Childhood abuse can create long-lasting scars, damage our perception of the world and set our brains to self-destruct until we are well into our 50s, say experts.

While the relationships that we form at a young age help us to develop, if they are destructive, they can negatively impact the rest of our lives.

Research has shown that childhood trauma, ranging from sexual abuse and parent’s divorce to alcoholism in the home, actually increases the odds of heart disease, stroke, depression and diabetes later on in life.

Furthermore, it also increases risky health behaviors such as smoking or having a large number of sexual partners, and even contributes to a lower life expectancy.

The study revealed that those traumatized as children, with six or more adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), died nearly 20 years earlier than those who had none.

As well as physical affects, these experiences are known to increase the risk of poor psychological health later.

Children who suffer trauma often grow to distrust others as a result of being betrayed by the very adults who are supposed to nurture and protect them, according to the Australian abuse support group Blue Knot Foundation.

Similarly, a study of more than 21,000 child abuse survivors age 60 and older in Australia revealed a much greater rate of failed marriages and relationships, with abuse survivors more  likely to rate themselves “not happy at all” or “not very happy.”

Other problems people with a history of child trauma are more likely to experience include depression, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse, addiction to gambling and shopping, and low self-esteem.

Despite this, there are a number of therapies and tools known to help trauma survivors such as mindful meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy. “

Pretending You’re Creative Will Make You More Creative

young artist moulding raw clay in art studio

young artist moulding raw clay in art studio

 

“Being more creative may be as easy as pretending you are. Creativity, that abstract muse, is increasingly thought of as essential not just to artistic pursuits but also to business success. Who doesn’t want to be more creative? Or, conversely, who wants to be more formulaic and rote?

Article: http://mentalfloss.com/article/76358/pretending-youre-creative-will-make-you-more-creative-study-says

A new study by researchers at the University of Maryland indicates that, much like how stereotypes about women being bad at math can lead to women performing worse on math tests, treating yourself like a stereotypical creative genius can lead to more creative thinking. In two different experiments detailed in PLOS ONE, the researchers primed more than 200 undergrads majoring in several different forms of art or science to imagine themselves as either a stereotypically creative professional (“an eccentric poet”) or a stereotypically stodgy one (“a rigid librarian”). The students then completed the Uses of Objects Task, a standard psychology test to measure creativity (as you might guess, you brainstorm various uses of objects). A control group completed the task without being primed to imagine themselves as having any specific characteristics or jobs.

The researchers found that the ability to think outside the box isn’t a static personality trait. It’s malleable, and influenced by stereotypes. Students who imagined themselves as eccentric poets were able to think of more (and more original) uses for objects like bricks than students in the control group. Students who imagined themselves as rigid librarians came up with significantly fewer creative uses than the control group. Not only did thinking of themselves as eccentric give students a creative boost, but thinking of themselves as rigid became an impediment to creativity.”

What a good excuse to declare yourself an artist and act super wacky.

[h/t Pacific Standard]