Category Archives: Health

Vogue closet org chart

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It’s Fall on Saturday! Time to get organized for the season change.  I came across this flow chart today and I LOVE it! I think it can help anyone organize their closet, house and life lol. It’s about getting real and clearing space, which are two important actions for being a human on the planet, AND for walking a spiritual path.

I think this could be helpful in many different ways. What do you think?

Here’s the article:

“When was the last time you were able to close your closet door? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Nor should you be: The task of cleaning out your closet solo is near impossible. When you look into your wardrobe, you see all the memories that give life to your clothes; you’re aware of the money you spent on them, and each time you consider extracting a piece, a chorus of “what ifs” sings in your head: What if miniskirts come back? What if I take a trip to Morocco? What if Jake Gyllenhaal asks me out on a date? What if Kristen Stewart invites me to play catch on the beach? It isn’t easy to limit your options, or find an advisor you trust who has the patience to take on the task with you.”

Here’s another piece that’s more brutal:

“Put anything that doesn’t fit, you haven’t worn in one year, or that is worn out into the ‘no’ pile.
No excuses. If you haven’t worn it, it goes. And why are you still keeping pilled sweaters around anyway? Those shoes that, though pretty, pinch your feet? No. Continue working your way through each category of clothing.”

Occasional fasting slows aging

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“Fasting is the greatest remedy — the physician within.”

~Paracelsus.

Apparently, intermittent fasting is one of the best things you can do for your body and mind. One of the more popular versions is to simply not eat from 7:00pm every night to 11:00am the following morning. I’ve tried it because I’m always looking for new ways to better my health and resolve. For me, it’s hard to sleep when I’m hungry, so I’m still working it out.

I’m not surprised by the studies saying fasting is good for you. I mean we’re all monkeys. If we were in the wild we wouldn’t be eating fettucine alfredo all day, as much as I would like to!

When you fast, even briefly, it switches on all kinds of positive changes in your body.  It raises your metabolism, increases human growth hormone, lowers insulin, clears the mind and reduces inflammation.

 

In pursuit of healthy aging

“Although previous work has shown how intermittent fasting can slow aging, we are only beginning to understand the underlying biology,” said William Mair, associate professor at Harvard Chan School.

By Karen Feldscher
Harvard Chan School Communications
November 3, 2017

“Manipulating mitochondrial networks inside cells — either by dietary restriction or by genetic manipulation that mimics it — may increase lifespan and promote health, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
The study, published Oct. 26 online in Cell Metabolism, sheds light on the basic biology involved in cells’ declining ability to process energy over time, which leads to aging and age-related disease, and how interventions such as periods of fasting might promote healthy aging.
Mitochondria — the energy-producing structures in cells — exist in networks that dynamically change shape according to energy demand. Their capacity to do so declines with age, but the impact this has on metabolism and cellular function was previously unclear. In this study, the researchers showed a causal link between dynamic changes in the shapes of mitochondrial networks and longevity.

This site has a lot of good information if you want to try it. Let me know your experiences and thought’s in the comments below ❤

 

What self care really means

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Excellent insight about self care. I often advise people in my practice to abide by H.A.L.T.S.: Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired, Sick. If you have any one of these needs, address it immediately before making big decisions.

But there’s more to it!

Check out this article by Brianna Wiest:

This Is What ‘Self-Care’ REALLY Means, Because It’s Not All Salt Baths And Chocolate Cake

 

“True self-care is not salt baths and chocolate cake, it is making the choice to build a life you don’t need to escape from!

…and that often takes doing the thing you don’t want to do.”

“Self-care is often a very unbeautiful thing.

It is making a spreadsheet of your debt and enforcing a morning routine and cooking yourself healthy meals and no longer just running from your problems and calling the distraction a solution.

It is often doing the ugliest thing that you have to do: like sweat through another workout or tell a toxic friend you don’t want to see them anymore, or get a second job so you can have a savings account, or figure out a way to accept yourself so that you’re not constantly exhausted from trying to be everything, all the time…

It often means looking your failures and disappointments square in the eye and re-strategizing. It is not satiating your immediate desires, it is letting go. It is choosing NEW. It is disappointing some people. It is making sacrifices for others. It is living a way that other people won’t, so maybe you can live in a way that other people can’t.

It is letting yourself be normal. Regular. Unexceptional. It is sometimes having a dirty kitchen and deciding your ultimate goal in life isn’t going to be having abs and keeping up with your fake friends. It is deciding how much of your anxiety comes from not actualizing your latent potential, and how much comes from the way you were being trained to think before you even knew what was happening.”

https://thoughtcatalog.com/brianna-wiest/2017/11/this-is-what-self-care-really-means-because-its-not-all-salt-baths-and-chocolate-cake/

It’s not what you think

Fantastic insights depression and the death of Chris Cornell. I also found this study that links addiction to childhood trauma:

http://upliftconnect.com/addiction-is-a-response-to-childhood-suffering/

IF YOU ARE STRUGGLING, PLEASE GET HELP. Asking for help doesn’t mean you’re weak, it’s a way of taking care of yourself and the people that love you.

The First Ten Words by Rich Larson

Chris Cornell, 1964-2017

Chris Cornell died early Thursday morning. His band Soundgarden played a show on Wednesday night at the Fox Theater in Detroit. Two hours after the show ended, he was gone.

For two days, I’ve been working on a piece to pay tribute to him, and it’s been a struggle. Usually when I have a problem like this it’s because I’m staring at a blank screen trying to figure out what I want to say. That’s not the problem this time. The problem is I have way too much to say.

I’m not going to sit here and claim to have been a huge fan of Soundgarden. I didn’t dislike them, I just had to take them in small doses. I was a fan of Cornell. I love “Seasons,” the solo song he had on Cameron Crowe’s movie, Singles. It’s a droning acoustic song about isolation and the…

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How childhood trauma could affect your life expectancy, relationships and mental health

This is an important article. If you feel you’ve suffered from childhood trauma, please get help and support. Please take it seriously. This is a common thread in many of the readings I do for people, and all of us deserve to find peace and happiness in our lives. Mindful Meditation is a fantastic method for dealing with these issues.
If this is you, please reach out and GET HELP.

 

Article by Sarah Young:

“Childhood abuse can create long-lasting scars, damage our perception of the world and set our brains to self-destruct until we are well into our 50s, say experts.

While the relationships that we form at a young age help us to develop, if they are destructive, they can negatively impact the rest of our lives.

Research has shown that childhood trauma, ranging from sexual abuse and parent’s divorce to alcoholism in the home, actually increases the odds of heart disease, stroke, depression and diabetes later on in life.

Furthermore, it also increases risky health behaviors such as smoking or having a large number of sexual partners, and even contributes to a lower life expectancy.

The study revealed that those traumatized as children, with six or more adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), died nearly 20 years earlier than those who had none.

As well as physical affects, these experiences are known to increase the risk of poor psychological health later.

Children who suffer trauma often grow to distrust others as a result of being betrayed by the very adults who are supposed to nurture and protect them, according to the Australian abuse support group Blue Knot Foundation.

Similarly, a study of more than 21,000 child abuse survivors age 60 and older in Australia revealed a much greater rate of failed marriages and relationships, with abuse survivors more  likely to rate themselves “not happy at all” or “not very happy.”

Other problems people with a history of child trauma are more likely to experience include depression, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse, addiction to gambling and shopping, and low self-esteem.

Despite this, there are a number of therapies and tools known to help trauma survivors such as mindful meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy. “